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Thursday, 24 September 2015

Burdens

We all carry burdens. Unresolved emotional issues that are trapped in our subconscious that weigh us down with their constant presence. Even though we might not consciously think about them, they are still affecting us within our causal bodies. Anyone who claims not to have any burdens are kidding themselves. We are humans in an incarnation, therefore we have burdens.

We all know that action follows thought. Thus if our thoughts are blocked by misgivings and regrets, and guilt, and a long list of other negative gearings that are better known as burdens, then our physical and mental wellbeing is bound to be affected. So few of us run at full potential; So few of us can get slip into 6th gear, spending our lives bogged down by the slippery moss that clings to the boulder.

Our physical health concerns are the effects, the cause of which is the heavy negatives that clog up our etheric bodies. There is no easy answer how to release ourselves from these toxins and tortures. Emotional attachments and emotional linkages to situations occur at every pitch and turn. We can even be burdened by the thoughts and the actions of others. It is a complex situation.

There is a solution however, and it will sound like a scratched record. By being your true, authentic self, you will minimise the effects of the toxins. By finding time and space to step out of the human condition, through meditation or walking in nature, we are able to reconnect with our etheric awareness. We can safely analyse the burdens in an observant mind state - mindfulness meditations are ideal for this. In a controlled mind state, our burdens can be witnessed as a third party and their existence understood.

Burdens can then be seen to be similar to the sheddable skins of the snake. As each realisation is felt and comprehended, the trapped emotional issues can be accepted and then assimilated. It then becomes perfectly clear that the secret to reducing burdens is the process known as forgive and forget. Life is too short to bear grudges - Matthew James